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Butterflies and Bees

It’s a warm and rainy Saturday here at the Garden Center.  When Gibbs and I did our morning walkabout I noticed the bees and butterflies were as happy as they could be as they flitted and buzzed from flower to flower sipping nectar and spreading pollen.  How pretty they are!

The Butterfly Bush keeps cranking out the gorgeous yellow blooms, and the butterflies always flock to its blooms.  I need to plant a few of these in my garden this year.

Is it raining in your area?  If so, why not put your houseplants outside and let the rain wash the dust off their leaves.  They’d also enjoy a good drink of rainwater versus the usual tap water.  It’s supposed to drop to the upper 30s tonight though, so be sure to bring them back inside.

Happy digging in the dirt!

Jeanni and Gibbs

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What Now?

Well.  Christmas 2012 is done and over with.  I hope yours was as wonderful as mine and Gibbs’ was.  We had a wonderful time hanging out with the family.  So now that it’s over, what are you going to do to fill up all that extra free time??  I have an idea…how about adding some winter color to your garden beds!

Camellia
Camellia

Lots of plants in the nursery are blooming.  The camellias are absolutely beautiful.  Also blooming is the tea olive, lacecap hydrangea (I swear that plant’s been blooming since October), roses, the citrus have flower buds forming, and, of course, the cool season annuals.

 

Because our ground doesn’t freeze, it’s a great time of the year to plant.  So why don’t you come visit me and Mr. Gibbs and pick out some color for your garden.  We’ll be looking for you!

Happy digging in the dirt.

Jeanni and Gibbs

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Reindeer and Christmas Color

Looking to add some Holiday color to your home or office?  We have beautiful white, pink, and red poinsettias to brighten up any area.

Poinsettias, Reindeer, and Gibbs
Poinsettias, Reindeer, and Gibbs

How about a couple of very cool reindeer for your garden??  You don’t have to worry about these reindeer eating your flowers!  We have a large one and a small one just waiting for you to take them home.  They are wooden and handmade by a Lake Helen woodworker.

Small Reindeer, Poinsettias, Large Reindeer, and Gibbs
Small Reindeer, Poinsettias, Large Reindeer, and Gibbs

Not really into Poinsettias?  Well, we got you covered with our gorgeous pink begonia hanging baskets…

Pink Begonia Hanging Baskets and Pink Poinsettias
Pink Begonia Hanging Baskets and Pink Poinsettias

And an equally gorgeous and massive red begonia hanging basket…

Red Begonia Hanging Basket
Red Begonia Hanging Basket

Pink and red wax begonias and red Angelwing begonias are also available in 6″ containers.

Merry Christmas!

Jeanni and Gibbs

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The Story of Poinsettias

Poinsettias. They’re such pretty plants, and very much a sign that the holidays are here. Here is some interesting information about Poinsettias that you might not know…

Joel Roberts Poinsett is the person who introduced Poinsettias (see the resemblance between his last name and the plant’s name??) to the United States in 1828. He was the US’s first Ambassador to Mexico and a botanist and physician. He fell in love with the plants he discovered in Southern Mexico and sent cuttings to his home in Charleston, South Carolina.

The colorful parts of the plants aren’t the flowers. Nope, those are actually colored bracts and are considered modified leaves. The flowers are yellow and are in the center of the colored bracts. The bracts get their color changes through a process called “photoperiodism.” That means they need 12 hours of total darkness for at least five days in a row to change color. Not just a little darkness, but total darkness. Light of any kind, real or synthetic, will throw off their color changing abilities. That’s why the Poinsettias you planted in the garden might not be as colorful as the ones you buy every holiday season.

Red Poinsettia
Red Poinsettia

I’m sure you’ve heard that old wives tale that Poinsettias are poisonous. Well, the National Poison Center in Atlanta and the American Medical Association have repeatedly tested the Poinsettia’s reportedly poisonous abilities and have found, repeatedly, that they are not poisonous. One study done at Ohio State University showed that 500 to 600 leaves would have to be eaten by a 50-pound child before any side effects would even start to show up. And those side effects would be upset stomach and vomiting…which makes sense if one eats 500 to 600 leaves of anything.

Poinsettias do ooze a milky sap when the stems are broken. That sap can cause allergic reactions to people who are allergic to latex.

Here’s an interesting tidbit: Florida has a native Poinsettia! How cool is that?? Euphorbia cyathophora (or Euphorbia heterophylla) is its botanical name. Common names are wild poinsettia, Fire on the mountain, fireplant, painted euphorbia, desert poinsettia, paint leaf and kaliko plant.

Native Poinsettia
Florida’s Native Poinsettia

And that is your Poinsettia history lesson for the day.  Did you learn anything?

Happy digging in the dirt!

Jeanni and Gibbs

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Handmade Cedar Furniture

Want to see something beautiful?  Well, just take a gander at this gorgeous cedar furniture.

Handmade, Cedar Adirondack Chair, Footstool, and Table
Handmade, Cedar Adirondack Chair, Footstool, and Table

It’s all handmade by a Lake Helen woodworker.  Solid cedar.  Has a beautiful finish.  There are three separate pieces:  the Adirondack chair, the footstool, and the table.

You know how sometimes Adirondacks are so deep that it’s almost embarrassing when you have to struggle to get out of it??  Not this one.  The dimensions are perfect, which make it a very comfortable chair.

Close your eyes.  Picture you in this chair, feet propped up, drink on the table, visually enjoying all the hard work you’ve put into your beautiful garden.  aahhhhh.  Now isn’t that a wonderful thought?

Handmade, Cedar Adirondack Chair, Footstool, and Table
Handmade, Cedar Adirondack Chair, Footstool, and Table

Happy digging in the dirt!

Jeanni and Gibbs